Aventurine and Peridot Crystal Grid for Prosperity

Crystal Grid for Prosperity

This crystal grid uses aventurine, peridot, pyrite included quartz, and clear quartz to attract prosperity. Above is my actual prosperity grid that I used for over a year and a half, and, while it took some time to get going, it ended up working very well. I have disassembled it now, since I don’t like to put my active spells online for personal reasons, but I don’t see any reason that I shouldn’t post it now. I hope you will find it helpful!

Supplies:

Aventurine x4
Clear quartz generator crystal
Crystal grid base
Peridot x4
Pyrite or pyrite included quartz points x8

Before you begin, cleanse the crystals and the grid using your preferred method.

Directions:

Chose a place to keep your crystal grid that won’t be disturbed for a long period of time. Since this is a prosperity grid it is associated with Earth, so on the East side of your home, room, or office is ideal. Start by assembling your grid in the pattern shown above. The generator crystal goes in the center, and the aventurine crystals are placed at the North, South, East, and West points. The peridot is spaced evenly between each aventurine at North East, South East, South West, and North West. Finally, the small, pyrite included quartz points (you can also use pyrite or clear quartz points) are placed between each crystal.

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Crystal Closeup: Malachite

“MALACHITE.
The sudden spoon is the same in no size. The sudden spoon is the wound in the decision.”

– Gertrude Stein, “Tender Buttons”

I would be remiss to discuss malachite without bringing up Gertrude Stein. Well, perhaps that’s not exactly true, but ever since I read “Tender Buttons” in college malachite has immediately brought the section of the poem above to mind. Malachite has actually been quite inspirational to authors, so, for the first time, there’s a literature section at the bottom of this crystal closeup post.

Malachite contains copper, and historically it was smelted, as well as used to create pigments, glazes, jewelry, and decorative pieces. Its name comes from the Greek word for “mallow” and it is known for its bands of bright green color. Malachite is found in many parts of the world with some of the best coming from the Congo, Morocco, Arizona, France, and South Australia; massive deposits have been found in Russia in the Ural Mountains. Malachite grows in many formations including fibrous aggregates, botryoidal or encrusting masses, and stalactites; it often grows with azurite as well. Unfortunately, cheap, synthetic malachite is being produced; real malachite won’t be nearly as inexpensive.

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Crystal Closeup: Carnelian

Carnelian, also called red carnelian, is one of my absolutely favorite crystals to work with. It’s a variety of chalcedony that is translucent and ranges from orange-red to very red, generally with streaks. Carnelian is one of the birthstones of May. If the bands are strong it is called carnelian agate; dark reddish-brown varieties are known as sard. Carnelian works to calm the blood, and I’ve found wearing a carnelian ring to be especially effective during my ‘moon time’ when pretty much nothing else calms me down even a little bit. My partner also knows that when I swap my rose quartz ring for the carnelian one, it’s ‘that time’ again.

Below is a breakdown of some of the important information about carnelian, which you can copy into your grimoire, and some suggested magickal activities.

Crystal: Carnelian

Astrology: Cancer, Leo, Taurus

Element: Fire

Family: Chalcedony

Mohs: 7

Magickal Uses: Cleansing, Protection

Metaphysical Properties: Assists with analysis, perception, memory, and precision, as it keeps the mind alert. Its calming, stabilizing energy also protects against anger, aggression, fear, and rage. Helps get rid of sadness, shyness, grief, and jealousy. It awakens inner talent and motivates work on that talent. Provides energy for emotionally stabilizing the home while encouraging harmony and love. Additionally, it cleanses negative energy from other crystals. Works well with other crystals for protection from negative energy and psychic attack.

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Full Moon July 9th 2017 in Capricorn

July 2017’s Full Moon in Capricorn has several times at which you can observe it. However, since it occurs at 12:07 AM EST on July 9th, it means that it may be technically on the 8th for some readers. Personally, I recommend doing your Full Moon charge on the night of the 8th because of this. The Moon enters Capricorn at 1:45 PM EST on July 7th, then stays in Capricorn until 10:12 PM on the 9th when it goes void-of-course. In short, your charge can be done on the night of the 7th or the 8th of July, but not the 9th.

This Full Moon ends the cycle that began with the New Moon in Capricorn on December 29th 2016.

My guide, Witch’s Guide to Full Moon Magick, can be found on the site here; this post is a companion to that guide. If you’re new to Moon magick that’s a great place to begin.

About July’s Full Moon

There are multiple names for July’s Full Moon, but the most common is the Thunder Moon. Other names are the Blessing Moon and Full Buck Moon. Thunder Moon comes from the prevalence of thunderstorms this time of year, which is absolutely accurate to me. Full Buck Moon is from the antlers which are now growing on male deer. Blessing Moon is part of the pagan tradition, this is the Moon before Lammas, the first of three harvest festivals. The message of this Full Moon is one of reflecting on what has gone well this year, ‘counting your blessings’ so to speak, and preparing for the harvest ahead.

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Aura Crystals: Are They Magickal?

Are aura crystals the next step in crystal evolution, or sparkling, rainbow-coated, fakes? The first time I ever saw an aura quartz crystal I thought it was some amazing, fairy-infused nugget of pure magic. Ironic, since aura crystals are bonded with metal and faeries don’t really like metal. Once I realized that auras are treated crystals – essentially man-made – the love affair ended before it began. Before the spark of desire completely faded, however, I did buy a few aura crystals, and was really unhappy with both the quality and the expense. However, a lot of people really love aura crystals or aura anything, so I thought it would be interesting to explore their creation (or rather modification) process and the general debate surrounding their magickal use.

How Are Aura Crystals Created?

To make an aura crystal the manufacturer starts with real crystals, almost always clear quartz, that is of an inferior quality due to coloration or damage. The crystals are put in a vacuum chamber, super-heated, and coated with vaporized metals that bonding with the crystal at an atomic level. The same process is used in car manufacturing. Importantly, the aura treatment is a coating, and because of that only affects the surface of the crystal. Aura crystals are expensive because of the metals used, such as gold or titanium, to achieve the color effect. It’s a great way to make a poorly-colored crystal super valuable, provided that you have the right equipment.

Recently, calcite, chalcedony conchas, agate slices, agate geodes, cactus quartz, tumbled stones, and amethyst cluster aura crystals have been popping up, too, with new crystal and color combinations surfacing all the time.

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Crystal Closeup: Topaz

Growing up as a November baby I must confess that I thought that I had lamest birthstone imaginable: topaz. It was just so yellow and I always longed for my sister’s birthstone (amethyst) to be mine instead. I felt like it was some cosmic mix-up where she got a cool birthstone and I got an uncool one. Happily, as an adult I made peace with my birthstone, and discovered that topaz and amethyst can be used in conjunction to create powerful, healing energy.

Topaz comes in a variety of colors including blue, brown, colorless, green, orange, and pink. The classic, yellow variety is the most common and is one of November’s birthstones. A lot of the topaz on the market has been treated in some way: much of blue topaz is heat-treated colorless topaz, and all ‘mystic topaz’ has been treated. Some of the most well-known natural topaz comes from Brazil, specifically the Ouro Preto deposit. The label ‘topaz’ was used for hundreds of years to indicate a yellow crystal, but in the 1800s the meaning of ‘topaz’ was refined, and many other colors of the gem were discovered.

Below is a breakdown of some of the important information about topaz, which you can copy into your grimoire, and some suggested magickal activities.

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Crystal Closeup: Citrine

Citrine is a rare crystal that ranges in color from pale yellow to a yellow-olive. Its name comes from ‘citron,’ the French word for ‘yellow.’ Citrine is a type of quartz and also often occurs with smokey quartz; smoky citrine and citrine with smoky phantoms are naturally occurring. Natural citrine gets its color from hydrous iron oxide and is one of the few naturally occurring yellow crystals. After amethyst, citrine is one of the most popular crystals in the world.

Ametrine is a different, relatively new discovery, found in the Anahi Mine in Bolivia. Ametrine is essentially part citrine and part amethyst, hence the portmanteau. Ametrine is formed due to a partial-heat exposure to the amethyst that creates the yellow color, and, because of this, ametrine does not have the iron inclusion of natural citrine. I went to a gem show and found someone selling Bolivian Ametrine from that very mine and he confirmed that the crystal is formed naturally through heat that occurs under ground. For ametrine I advise using the metaphysical properties of amethyst with a yellow boost.

You can’t talk about citrine without discussing heat treated amethyst. It’s such a pet peeve of mine that my friend regularly holds it up in crystal shops and waits for me to roll my eyes. It bothers me because the properties of amethyst and citrine are not similar, let alone interchangeable. That means when you accidentally use heat treated amethyst in the place of citrine, you think you’re working with citrine, and you’re not. Additionally, the healing properties of amethyst are compromised by the treatment process. The process is so simple that you can do it in your home oven, though I do not recommend it at all. Here you can see my photo, taken last December, showing a natural citrine point (top/right) in comparison to a heat treated amethyst cluster being sold as citrine (bottom/left). Fake citrine is one of my crystal pet peeves, maybe my top crystal peeve.

Real citrine is much more expensive than fake citrine, so keep that in mind when you’re shopping. Also, real citrine never appears in that dark, amber color, or on a matrix similar to amethyst. Fake citrine tumble stones are incredibly common; they are a combination of white and this honey amber color always. Hibiscus Moon has a great post about this issue and goes into the science of how it works, so if you’re interested in learning more, check out her article here.

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