Aura Crystals: Are They Magickal?

Are aura crystals the next step in crystal evolution, or sparkling, rainbow-coated, fakes? The first time I ever saw an aura quartz crystal I thought it was some amazing, fairy-infused nugget of pure magic. Ironic, since aura crystals are bonded with metal and faeries don’t really like metal. Once I realized that auras are treated crystals – essentially man-made – the love affair ended before it began. Before the spark of desire completely faded, however, I did buy a few aura crystals, and was really unhappy with both the quality and the expense. However, a lot of people really love aura crystals or aura anything, so I thought it would be interesting to explore their creation (or rather modification) process and the general debate surrounding their magickal use.

How Are Aura Crystals Created?

To make an aura crystal the manufacturer starts with real crystals, almost always clear quartz, that is of an inferior quality due to coloration or damage. The crystals are put in a vacuum chamber, super-heated, and coated with vaporized metals that bonding with the crystal at an atomic level. The same process is used in car manufacturing. Importantly, the aura treatment is a coating, and because of that only affects the surface of the crystal. Aura crystals are expensive because of the metals used, such as gold or titanium, to achieve the color effect. It’s a great way to make a poorly-colored crystal super valuable, provided that you have the right equipment.

Recently, calcite, chalcedony conchas, agate slices, agate geodes, cactus quartz, tumbled stones, and amethyst cluster aura crystals have been popping up, too, with new crystal and color combinations surfacing all the time.

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