25 More Bullet Journal Ideas for Witches

Pink Journal with Pencils

In the first part of this series I listed 25 Bullet Journal Ideas for Witches, and below you will find 25 more! I have been loving my BuJo, so hopefully some of these ideas will inspire you.

Astrology & Moon Magick

1. Full Moon Ritual Page
2. Mercury Retrograde Mood/Event Tracker
3. New Moon Ritual Page

Favorites

4. Favorite Magickal Authors
5. Favorite Witch Shops (online or in person)
6. Favorite Witchy Quotes
7. Favorite Spells
8. Favorite Witchy Movies or TV Shows

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25 Bullet Journal Ideas for Witches

Bullet Journal Ideas for Witches and Pagans

There’s no shortage of bullet journal guides out there, but what about bullet journaling for witches? We have a specific set of needs, so below are some witchy ways to fill your bullet journal that I hope you will find inspiring.

What is a Bullet Journal (BuJo)?

In short, a bullet journal is an organizational system that favors simplicity above all else. A bullet journal can be created with nothing more than a notebook and a pen; they are a catch-all way to organize life. The bullet journal system was created by Rider Carroll. If you have never heard of bullet journaling before, the basics can be found on the BulletJournal.com website.

BuJo Page Ideas for Witches

Astrology & Moon Magick

1. Monthly Moon Phases
2. Yearly Full & New Moon Phases and/or Dates
3. Yearly or Monthly Planetary Movement (Cosmic Concerns)
4. Your Birth Chart
5. Numerology (monthly or yearly)
6. Mercury Retrogrades
7. Lunar Tracker

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A Witch’s Guide to Lunar Trackers

Bullet journaling seems to be tailor made for witches of all levels who are interested in tracking their practice. A sub-set of bullet journaling is graphic trackers, of which a moon wheel is about as perfect for witchcraft as you can get. Lunar trackers can be used to keep track of the minutiae of the moon’s movement throughout the lunar cycle, thus helping witches move into advanced spell work and get to know themselves (and their craft) better.

Getting into intermediate and advanced witchcraft requires more advanced lunar tracking techniques; whether you choose to use the information or not, it’s good to know where the moon’s at. While waiting until there is a waxing moon in Scorpio to do you body-positivity spell may sound fussy, it can give a much-needed boost to witches moving into a phase of more advanced spellwork. My disclaimer is that, if you’re a baby witch who is just starting out, don’t be bothered too much about moon times or signs. Full moon and new moon are the only dates you need to know, once you’re completely comfortable with that, then move on to more advanced tracking.

I recommend using the lunar tracking wheel (pictured above) made by Cheeky Magpie; I like a plain one, but she also created some with seasonal backgrounds that are very nice. Witches are not, by a big stretch of the imagination, the only people who track the moon. People plant by it, fish by it, breed animals by it, track their cycles by it, even use the moon to monitor their moods; just about anything you can think of people have used these moon charts for. Because they are so non-denominational, I’ll show you how to witch them up for your practice.

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A Witch’s Guide to Starting Your Grimoire and/or Book of Shadows

This little adventure started when I tried to find planner supplies for my Grimoire. There’s almost nothing out there that’s specifically designed for witches, and what is out there is too fussy for my taste. I don’t know about you all, but for me, compiling a good Book of Shadows is very important to the practice of my Craft. Additionally, it’s so personal, it has to be perfect. The New Year (Lunar, Solar, or the Vernal Equinox) is such a wonderful opportunity for things like this, I think, but you can start your Book of Shadows any time. I don’t know about you, but I love a project. As far as witchcraft is concerned, this is the project of all projects.

For me, figuring out the format for my Book of Shadows was a near-identity crisis. Counting some missteps and corrections it took a year and a half for me to figure out what I really wanted. Here’s some advice from my try/fail/do it the hard way experience that I hope you’ll find helpful.

Part two of this series is now available: A Witch’s Guide to Organizing Your Grimoire and/or Book of Shadows.

Monthly writing prompts for your Grimoire/Book of Shadows are being posted, so check out the “writing prompts” tag for more inspiration!

Grimoire or Book of Shadows?

I tend to use the two terms almost interchangeably, but they do have different meanings. In short, a Grimoire is impersonal and a Book of Shadows is personal. A Grimoire wouldn’t feature your personal dreams, tarot readings, crystal grids, etc., but a Book of Shadows would. Grimoires would be comparable to Commonplace Books which are/were collections of interesting facts, puzzles, and quotations that people used to maintain. It wasn’t a personal diary, but it was personal in an impersonal way. A Grimoire would be similar; it’s not a magickal diary, but it does contain magickal information. In short: You can put Grimoire information in a Book of Shadows, but you cannot put Book of Shadows (personal) information in a Grimoire and still have it considered a Grimoire. Some people suggest keeping two books (Flying the Hedge has a good article), and my partner suggested this very thing to me as well. The dashboards I made for my coven and myself (shown below) are designed for a Book of Shadows, because they’re about the here and now, containing specific a month, year, and dates. It’s not ‘evergreen’ material, which is what goes in a Grimoire. Eventually, I would like it maintain both a Book of Shadows and a Grimoire.

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